Lawmaker calls for lifting ban on transporting dogs from 113 countries


On Monday, 57 bipartisan lawmakers, including Congressman Ted Deutch, sent a letter to the CDC director asking them to lift the July ban that prevents the importation of dogs from 113 countries. These countries include Afghanistan, Russia, Dominican Republic, Egypt. and parts of China. In the community: Boys and Girls Club sees increase in food insecurity Big Dog Ranch Rescue Founder Lauree Simmons said she was grateful to lawmakers for speaking out against CDC’s suspension of imported dogs from over 100 countries. She fears more dogs will die each day the ban remains in place. “The ban is impacting thousands of dog lives, possibly a million a year, that cannot be saved and enter the country,” Simmons said. . The ban is a move to prevent the spread of rabies, but Simmons said it’s not a common problem. “We brought thousands of dogs,” Simmons said. “We have never introduced rabies and I don’t know of any of the rescue partners we deal with. “The chemo was tough. But I’m harder: ‘The Palm Beach Gardens girl celebrated after the latest chemotherapy treatment Simmons said the ban is impacting many people, including the military and women. back, ”Simmons said. “I know so many who are stuck, and they refuse to come home because they can’t bring their dogs with them.” The ban is also impacting Big Dog Ranch Rescue, which saves dogs from slaughterhouses in China. 750 dogs are still sitting there in warehouses and they’ve been quarantined by the government, ”Simmons said. “They all have their vaccines, have been checked by vets, but they just can’t get out. Conditions. Animal rights activists are hoping something will be done soon, because the fate of the animals is at stake.” That stops the asks about a puppy mill, “Simmons said.” It’s giving a dog a life and saving it from torture in another country. In fact, they’re filling a home for a loving family. ” CDC to work with stakeholders to create a solution that not only protects public health but also allows responsible members of the pet rescuer community to continue their work.

On Monday, 57 bipartisan lawmakers, including Congressman Ted Deutch, sent a letter to the CDC director asking them to lift the July ban which prevents dogs from being imported from 113 countries.

These countries include Afghanistan, Russia, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, and parts of China.

In the community: Boys and Girls Club sees increased food insecurity

The founder of Big Dog Ranch Rescue, Lauree Simmons, said she was grateful lawmakers spoke out against the CDC’s suspension of dogs imported from more than 100 countries. She fears more dogs will die each day the ban remains in place.

“The ban is impacting thousands of dog lives, possibly a million a year, that cannot be saved and enter the country,” Simmons said.

The ban is a move to prevent the spread of rabies, but Simmons said it’s not a common problem.

“We brought thousands of dogs,” Simmons said. “We have never introduced rabies and I do not know of any cases of it in all of the rescue partners we deal with.”

“The chemo was tough. But I’m harder: ‘ Palm Beach Gardens girl celebrated after her latest chemotherapy treatment

Simmons said the ban had an impact on many people, including the military and women.

“Even the military, when they’re overseas, and they adopt a dog and they can’t bring it back,” Simmons said. “I know so many who are stuck, and they refuse to come home because they can’t bring their dogs with them.”

The ban is also impacting Big Dog Ranch Rescue, which saves dogs from slaughterhouses in China.

“We still have over 750 dogs sitting there in warehouses and they’ve been quarantined by the government,” Simmons said. “They all have their vaccines, have been checked by vets, but they just can’t get out. “

Economic titles: Shortages continue as supply chain struggles to meet demand

Lawmakers urge the CDC to modernize the import system and impose more testing requirements. Animal rights activists are hopeful that something will be done soon, as the fate of the animals is at stake.

“This stops the demand on a puppy mill,” Simmons said. “It’s giving life to a dog and saving it from torture in another country. In fact, they fill a home for a loving family.

Lawmakers are calling on the CDC to work with stakeholders to create a solution that not only protects public health but also allows responsible members of the pet rescues community to continue their work.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *