Amazing amount of money ‘puppy breeders’ are making – as animal rights groups slam the practice

A backyard dog breeder has flaunted his wealth after selling dogs online for huge profits as animal rights groups demand a ban on the practice and call on Australians to adopt a dog of a shelter instead.

The breeder, named Anthony, displays hundreds of dollars in $50 bills on a bed, before showing off in designer clothes and encouraging others to start dog breeding businesses as well.

He claims to make enough money selling Cavoodle puppies to fuel a $20,000-a-month lifestyle that includes fancy cars, flashy vacations abroad, and fancy dinners at expensive restaurants.

“This is your sign to start dog breeding,” the backyard breeder wrote in a post displaying his wealth to social media followers.

animal rights groups concerned about their practices” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Owners of barnyard dog breeding businesses openly flaunt their wealth online – with animal rights groups concerned about their practices

A Cavoodle 'breeder' named Anthony has posted a series of photos and images on his private social media pages bragging about how much money he has made selling <a class=puppies” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

A Cavoodle ‘breeder’ named Anthony has posted a series of photos and images on his private social media pages bragging about how much money he has made selling puppies

He claims to make enough money selling the popular <a class=dog breed (pictured) to fuel a $20,000-a-month lifestyle” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

He claims to make enough money selling the popular dog breed (pictured) to fuel a $20,000-a-month lifestyle

Anthony (pictured) claims to make enough money selling Cavoodle puppies to fuel a $20,000-a-month lifestyle

Anthony (pictured) claims to make enough money selling Cavoodle puppies to fuel a $20,000-a-month lifestyle

L'

Other posts show the rancher driving an expensive European sports car

The ‘raiser’ bragged about his collection of sneakers and luxury cars in other videos

WHAT IS A COURT DOG BREEDER?

A backyard breeder is an amateur, unlicensed breeder whose breeding is considered substandard, with little or no effort toward ethical and selective breeding.

Unlike puppy mills and other animal breeding mills, backyard breeders breed on a small scale, usually at home with their own pets (hence the description of “backyard court”), and may be motivated by monetary profit.

His profile is filled with comments from dissenting members of the public, with many sharing the “adopt, don’t buy” mantra while others called his behavior “unethical”.

“Only do this if you really care about the puppies and you are going to do it safely. It’s not just an easy way to make money,’ one person replied to her cheeky videos.

“You shouldn’t be encouraging people to do this. It’s a horrible job, another commented, before the man replied that his job was “not unethical.”

“If done correctly, it’s not unethical. It’s natural for dogs,” he said.

Others lamented the overcrowded pounds, which are bringing in record numbers of surrendered dogs and cats after the pandemic.

‘How can you want to make a profit breeding dogs when so many dogs need rescuing? You are the problem and you don’t like dogs,” one woman wrote.

“And that’s why there are so many dogs in the pound,” another woman commented.

The man has responded to one of his critics, attempting to distance himself from ‘backyard breeders’ and claiming his dogs have a better life than his – despite openly bragging about his income in several publications.

“No, there are dogs in the pound because of the backyard breeders. When done in the professional way we do, the dogs continue to live a better life than me,” he said.

The company’s page does not feature any of its brazen behavior, instead trying to present itself as a legitimate operation.

It is described as selling ‘Exclusive Premium Cavoodles’ and is ‘operated 24/7’.

In Sydney, Cavoodle puppies sell for up to $6,000 each

The breed, which is a mix between Poodles and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, has become extremely popular as the dogs are hypoallergenic (don’t shed their fur), cute and great with children.

The man claims to spend up to $19,000 a month on his high-flying lifestyle following the sale of Cavoodles, posting images from his bank account

The man claims to spend up to $19,000 a month on his high-flying lifestyle following the sale of Cavoodles, posting images from his bank account

Videos show Anthony bragging about his wealth and eating at lavish restaurants

He regularly posts clips buying designer brands

Videos show Anthony bragging about his wealth, eating at lavish restaurants and buying designer labels

Animal welfare groups are concerned about rising cases of Australians breeding expensive dogs, usually poodle crosses, and selling them via Instagram, with no way to monitor the treatment of the dogs and the breeders’ practices.

They say the trend has skyrocketed during the pandemic and have called for a ban on ‘backyard farming’ in New South Wales.

Emma Hurst, Animal Justice Party MP at the NSW Legislative Council, told Daily Mail Australia that an investigation by her office found these types of pages could fetch more than $50,000 from a single litter.

“Animal farming can be a very lucrative business, which is problematic when there is no real legislation to protect animals used for breeding,” Ms Hurts said.

“Backyard breeders are breeders who are unskilled and unskilled, and could risk reproducing hereditary defects in animals that will cause the animal to suffer for life.

“As long as puppy breeding and barnyard farming remain legal in New South Wales, this is a system that will continue to be easily exploited, harming dogs and members of the public.

“There is no proper system to ensure the welfare of dogs in breeding establishments, which means that thousands of dogs are used for profit.”

She said the ‘breeder’ flaunting his wealth through his Cavoodle business shows how easily anyone can make money from puppy businesses.

“Although the videos on this TikTok page do not show animals in distress, the account shows how easy it is for anyone to start a farming business with the end goal of profiting from animals,” Ms. Hurst to Daily Mail Australia.

“The real risk arises when profit outweighs animal welfare,”

“The public will never accept questionable backyard breeding or intensive dog breeding – both must be banned in NSW so dogs can be protected from exploitation.”

Animal rights groups have criticized the growing trend of unlicensed and unregulated breeders appearing online, which has skyrocketed during the pandemic

Animal rights groups have criticized the growing trend of unlicensed and unregulated breeders appearing online, which has skyrocketed during the pandemic

Anthony's page indicates that he breeds

Anthony’s page says he breeds “exclusive premium Cavoodles” and operates “24/7”.

Voiceless, a non-profit animal welfare charity, said practices such as backyard “puppy farms” were driving thousands more pets into shelters.

“We support responsible pet guardianship that meets all animal needs and we encourage the adoption of non-commercial animals,” a spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia.

“We oppose the commercial breeding of cats and dogs in ‘puppy farm’ situations, the breeding of pet animals for pet shops and are concerned about the growing demand from Australians who buy dogs in online, driven largely by the COVID pandemic.

“These are unnecessary practices when hundreds of thousands of unwanted cats and dogs need homes.”

Daily Mail Australia has approached the dog breeder for comment.

UNDESIRABLE BREEDING PRACTICES OF FARMYARD FARMERS

Animal welfare groups say backyard breeders are likely to exhibit any of the following characteristics:

Ignorance of selective breeding goals and techniques and lack of familiarity with the breed standard of the type of animal being bred.

Exclusive focus on breed standard involving little genetic testing or inbreeding coefficient calculations.

Raising a working breed for looks rather than working ability. This is a criticism also directed at “reputable” breeders who breed for the show ring – in some cases separate working and show strains have emerged.

Lack of adequate veterinary care and maintenance.

Excessive reproduction of individual females, to the detriment of their health.

Sale of animals with genetic disorders or undisclosed diseases before they become apparent to buyers.

Failure to screen potential owners or provide appropriate information to prevent buyers from purchasing an animal that may not be suitable for them or their lifestyle.